Incredible Jeremiah

A life changer, this book ushers you before a hurting God and his wounded prophet. “Night and day my eyes overflow with tears. I cannot stop weeping, for my virgin daughter-my precious people- has been struck down…” (Jer. 14:17).

As a reader said, “But, again and again, Reggie, I see now just why you wrote this book. I feel in many ways a very foolish and self-centered slob in the realization of how I, like most of us I guess, am so self-centered in never ever thinking about the Lord’s deep hurt and pain for being ignored and not treated as a Father, as I long myself to be treated by my own daughter.”

260 pages of challenging, transformational presentation of an outstanding historical figure, and his ultra-outstanding God.

“I simply don’t have the words, Reggie, to express my gratitude to you for opening up my understanding of God’s heart towards His “Chosen People” and us, His kids grafted into His Olive Tree.”

Available on Amazon and all other book and eBook sellers worldwide.

For a discount on the print book, click the link below and enter the code “5off” and it will be shipped direct from the printer.

Happy encounters with incredible Jeremiah!

Diverse Reading

Let me confess at the start that I am not a very good reader. I do not enjoy reading, but I do hunger to learn and grow in my understanding of many things. So, reading, for me, is a semi-painful means to an important end.

Our brains benefit from exercise. Reading in multiple fields of knowledge is of great benefit. These past weeks have found me diving into diverse readings; from the scientific study of light, to mental constructs referred to as paradigms, to numerous mental health issues, to numerous areas of theology and Biblical studies, etc.   

The book shown here is actually easy reading, but it has affected me so much that it caused me to change my sermons these past few weeks. Hats off to Doug Newton. He has done a great service with his “Fresh Eyes” series. I suggest you take a look.

Happy reading.

The Champion

Amidst darkness, confusion, and uncertainty, who do you want with you as you enter the new year?  May I offer a suggestion? Let’s go with the CHAMPION!

The newly announced “Beloved Son of God”[1] was handed over to the Diabolical One.[2]

Jesus … was led by the Spirit into the wilderness, where for forty days he was tempted by the devil. He ate nothing during those days. Luke 4:1-2.

Understand! This adversary is a thoroughly venomous, maniacal, self-consumed “hater of God” (and all that is good). His hatred burned especially toward God’s perfect Son.

There must have been parameters set by God, as we find he did regarding Job (Job 1:8-12; 2:3-6). But Diabolos was given 5 ½ weeks to wear Jesus down, emaciate him, and hit him hard from every angle.

We can read about the final three attacks that took place on the 40th day.

First of all, think for a minute what was required for this 40-day fast to happen.  Jesus had to be super healthy: physically, mentally and spiritually. It is possible for people to fast for 40 days or more, but it is an extremely rare – and very fit person – who can handle it.  Jesus was fit, strong and disciplined.[3] 

Imagine being alone for 40 days.  No conversations.[4] No stories, jokes, news, no media, nothing.  It is a rare person who can handle such isolation, let alone when accompanied by 40 days without food.  Add to this a hostile environment: Rugged, barren, burning during the day, cold during the nights.  Hyena’s howling, scorpions hiding, vipers brooding… Jesus was put through a real test![5]  

The curious, active mind we catch a glimpse of at age 12[6] certainly didn’t shut down during these 40 days of testing.  He had no scrolls to read.  No newspaper deliveries, no sports magazines.  Oh yes, and no social media. But he no doubt had a disciplined regimen of meditation which he followed through that long period of time.  He knew large contents of the Old Testament by rote and could work progressively through chapter and verse as he meditated on such grand things as his identity, his mission, and of course, the character and grace of His Father.

This was an opportune time to think through all these things.

During that time the devil came and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, tell these stones to become loaves of bread.”

Note: Satan’s challenge (If you are the Son of God) is directly related to perhaps the last words Jesus had heard spoken (from heaven 40 days earlier), “This is my dearly loved Son, who brings me great joy.”

There is strong innuendo in the Tempter’s question/statement/challenge: “That Father of yours has forgotten all about you! He doesn’t respect you enough to treat you the way you deserve!  Why should the “Son of God” be left destitute like this?  Do something about it!  Assert yourself!  Here’s some stones, at least make yourself some bread to eat!”

But Jesus told him, “No! The Scriptures say, ‘People do not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.’” 

Jesus directly answered the innuendo. “I’m doing just fine!  My Father is supplying exactly what I need.  I am being fed, morning through night, on the bread of life, my Father’s word.  I am not looking for some silly bread to eat.  When my body absolutely needs it, I can trust my Father to provide in whatever way he chooses.”

Then the devil took him to the holy city, Jerusalem, to the highest point of the Temple, 

We don’t know the mechanics involved, but the sudden relocation from the barren, desolate no-mans-land of Judea to a high point overlooking the big city of Jerusalem had to have been a shock to Jesus’ already depleted system!  Visual stimulation, noise, smells, humans!  Internally, emotionally, Jesus could not have been prepared for this sudden and dramatic change.

and said, “If you are the Son of God, jump off”

And did Satan encourage that jumping by standing him right on the edge, with a strong unsteady wind (and even rain?) blowing at his back?  Did he leave him in that dangerous position for a long time?  Did he time it so that crowds of people were down there waiting?  We don’t know. But in his weakened physical and emotional state Jesus must have been dizzy, somewhat confused, and groping for help in knowing what to do.

The Tempter continues, “…For the Scriptures say, ‘He will order his angels to protect you. And they will hold you up with their hands so you won’t even hurt your foot on a stone.’” 

The innuendo is again almost deafening: “So you say the word of God is all that is important to you.  Why don’t you show the whole world how much you trust in that word.  Jump!  God says he will catch you.  Let’s see how much you trust him!”  (Satan is wily).

Jesus responded, “The Scriptures also say, ‘You must not test the Lord your God.’” 

This answer of Jesus is most clever.  He didn’t just extract a scripture text to answer the situation, he addresses the very heart of Satan’s challenge.  “I don’t need to prove that I trust God’s word.  I trust my Father implicitly – always have and always will.  For me to jump here is totally unnecessary, it would be a lack of faith on my part, it would be a “test” of God. That is unbelief, not faith.” (Consider Gideon in Judges 6:36-40).

Next the devil took him to the peak of a very high mountain

Another sock to the system.  Another sudden change of environment, climate, stimulation.  I wouldn’t be surprised if the Evil One took his time here (as well as on the temple).  Why should he hurry?   This was his chance to get the upper hand.  Let Jesus feel the cold.  His emaciated body with no resistance; shivering, shaking, looking for warmth and protection. 

and showed him the kingdoms of the world and all their glory.  

I would think Satan started this diabolical video presentation with scenes of warmth, comfort, hot freshly-cooked food, (even if the video didn’t come complete with smells – and I wouldn’t put it past him to provide such a thing – Jesus’ human system would add the smells, the sounds, and create the cravings that Satan aimed for).  Satan is cruel, vicious, vindictive.  He was raving mad at being defeated twice already.  There is nothing good about him.  He had no mercy on our Lord.  After racking Jesus’ system with such sights and sounds and smells as would make any of us go mad in that situation, he must have continued to show wealth, comfort, opulence, and companionship, with the message being “join me and you will never suffer again!”

“I will give it all to you,” he said,

Innuendo: “Unlike your neglectful father, who raised your hopes at Jordan only to abandon you, I, yes I, will give you all of this.  You will never be short of food, clothes, and companionship ever again. No more suffering for you! The whole world is mine and I give it all to you for one small price.”

“…if you will kneel down and worship me.” 

The Tempter has given his best shot.  He weakened Jesus as much as he possibly could.  He offered him all that he could deliver, and packaged it in the best way.  The future of the universe now laid in the hands of the second Adam.  The first Adam was the one who handed control of the world over to Satan in the first place (1 John 5:19), Jesus is being asked to accept that ownership as legitimate.  Something that even in his tortured, weakened, very vulnerable state Jesus was not willing to do.

“Get out of here, Satan,” Jesus told him. “For the Scriptures say, ‘You must worship the Lord your God and serve only him.’”  Then the devil went away,

Do we appreciate what a great victory this was?  God allowed these 40 days for Satan to test Jesus.  Satan used all that was in his power to break him down, weaken him, and set him up for the fall.  Satan had witnessed starving Esau give up his birthright for a bowl of soup (Gen 25:29-34).  He arranged for Jesus to get more physically and emotionally desperate than Esau ever was, then he pumped him with visual stimuli to whip up all sorts of cravings, and then he offered Him far, far more than soup.  Satan tried his very best to bribe Him, to crack Him, but he failed totally, and had to leave in shame and rage.

and angels came and took care of Jesus.

Why the angels?  This shows how weakened and needy Jesus had become.  His very life was on the line.  He was in desperate need of help, of warmth, nourishment, and rest (Psa. 91:9-16).  Satan left him up there on the mountain.  Why should he have done otherwise?  But as soon as Jesus completed the test, God sent Him the help He needed (as he did with Elijah in 1 Kings 19:5-8, and countless other heroes through the ages and around the world).  This victory was no small accomplishment on Jesus’ part.  It exhausted Him, brought him near death.  But Jesus conquered! What a man Jesus is!  If you don’t have the utmost respect for Jesus then you don’t yet really know Him.

We are about to enter a new year. Amidst darkness, confusion, uncertainty,  who do you want to enter the new year with?  I choose Jesus, the champion over all that is contrary to God.

N.B. Lest you get a wrong idea from this story, Jesus was not a loner, he was the ultimate people-person. He will not attach himself to just you. He will give you his full attention, yes. But he will also give his full attention to your family members, your neighbors, the homeless, the widow, the orphan, your rivals or “enemies.” No one can walk with Jesus and not be challenged into massive transformation. The most annoying and obnoxious person in your life is loved by Jesus just as much as you are. You need to love that person too.


[1] Mat. 3:16-17, Luk. 3:21-22.

[2] Briefly described below.

[3] It is very unlikely this was the first time he fasted. Fasting is something that is learned through repeated practice, and Jesus was ready when this very long fast came up.

[4] And Jesus was no introvert. He was a people person in a society of people persons.

[5] If you don’t have the highest respect for Jesus then you really don’t know him. 

[6] Luke 2:46,47.

Reading the Bible with God at your side

Episode 2[1]

This heading may seem strange, unusual, perhaps irreverent. Yet, reading the Bible while conscious of its Author’s physical presence will make a huge difference to your reading. He becomes the proverbial “elephant in the room.”[2] You can’t ignore Him. He doesn’t go away. You are obligated to relate everything you read to HIM.  You must respond.

Arriving at what we call the second verse of the Bible, some unexpected statements appear.

It’s a murky, confusing scene! “Formless and empty” is the created earth. “Covered with darkness” are the deep waters.  And “hovering” over this darkness is the Spirit of God.  What? How? What?

One’s mind wants to run down many “rabbit trails” with questions and answers and arguments and debates, but Oooops! Almost forgot. The Author is still right here in the room! What now? You look around feeling rather self-conscious.

Stop your racing mind! Realize that minuscule, human minds are no match for Almighty God! It is His Word! Time to at least bow your head, admit confusion, and ask questions humbly!

You are a God of order, not disorder (1 Cor. 14:33), so how does this “new heavens and new earth” begin in such a mess?

Also, you are a God of light, and in you is no darkness at all (1 Jo. 1:5), but why is your earth “covered with darkness?”  I would really like some answers, Divine Author!

Silence. You bow and ask again. Silence still.

Then a thought comes to mind, something to explore. Maybe this thought came from Author Himself.

The Bible doesn’t tell us everything we want to know.

We can’t get answers from the Bible if the answers aren’t there! If the answers aren’t there, then God must consider those questions as not so important! It is actually healthy to have unanswered questions. Questions keep us humble and seeking. Two health-inducing qualities! 

It might be time to get on the ol’ knees again. “Author, I want to trust you, that you both know and do what is best.”

Somehow Deuteronomy 29:29 comes to mind and you look it up.

“The Lord our God has secrets known to no one. We are not accountable for them, but we and our children are accountable forever for all that he has revealed to us, so that we may obey all the terms of these instructions.” Amen.Leave the questions hanging. Time to move on, tomorrow, to the exciting next 6 days!


[1] Episode #1 happened in relation to Gen. 1:1 – “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” And involved stooping to the ground in amazement.

[2] Large, out-of-place, unavoidable, can’t get out of your mind, makes one feel awkward, small, vulnerable,….

No Recluse

Jeremiah was no recluse. His upbringing as a priest, and his calling to be a prophet, rules out such behavior. His business, his focus, his attention was people.

Yes. He was commanded to not marry (16:1-4). He was forced to stay away from funeral gatherings (16:5-7) and happy feasts (16:8-9). The Lord had specific reasons for this,[1] but it may have given him a reputation as uncaring and self-absorbed.[2]  His writing and his prayers, however, show otherwise (4:19, 8:18, 9:1,[3] 13:17,[4] 14:17, 23:9).

Jeremiah functioned amidst political turmoil, religious delusion, social unrest, severe injustice,[5] and wide-spread fear and suspicion. Rather than going “high brow” and judgmental, he did the opposite and identified with the people on all levels.[6]

Five different kings warmed the throne during his time of service. Two foreign powers invaded, deposed kings, and imposed taxes on their vassal state. And things got worse. The events surrounding Jeremiah’s lifetime formed one continuous downward spiral. His first assignment was to scour the streets of Jerusalem to find one honest person (5:1); he came up empty-handed.  For 40 years he fought with all his wisdom and strength to avert Judah and Jerusalem from destruction. But his efforts were not enough (25:3; 32:1-5), due to the impetulance of his people (32:30-31).  He wept and grieved not for himself, but for his beloved people.


[1] His life was to be a living picture of the severity of God’s deserved anger. Jeremiah was told the reasons behind the restrictions. The people were digging their own graves and the Lord wanted them to see this and change their ways. He had better plans for them but they were refusing to cooperate (16:12-18).

[2] Us modern people probably can’t understand the full burden and strain these restrictions caused him.

[3] In the next verse Jeremiah vents the feelings that could drive him away from society, but he did not act on it.

[4] “And if you still refuse to listen, I will weep alone because of your pride. My eyes will overflow with tears, because the Lord’s flock will be led away into exile.” 13:17.

[5] One example: The laws God gave his people called for mercy and justice. Those who went bankrupt would indenture themselves to a wealthy person. They served in a slave-like capacity, but this situation could only last a maximum of 6 years, because every sabbath (7th) year, slaves were to be freed with pay (Exo. 21:2, Deu. 15:2). But the wealthy of Jeremiah’s days refused to do so, and no leaders enforced it. (34:13-16).

[6] “My grief is beyond healing; my heart is broken. Listen to the weeping of my people; it can be heard all across the land. ‘Has the Lord abandoned Jerusalem?’ the people ask. ‘Is her King no longer there?’” “I hurt with the hurt of my people. I mourn and am overcome with grief… Why is there no healing for the wounds of my people?” 8:18-19, 21-22.

God’s Incredible Respect

Jeremiah is a tough, tough book to read and to grasp, but so very worth the effort.

Its message is broad and deep. It ties back to the rest of the Old Testament, and it undergirds and foretells the New Covenant. It is MUST reading for followers of Christ and students of God’s Word.

Of great importance, it documents, explains, and illustrates – over and over again – how God has chosen to operate in this world. The strength of this message is startling. It is different than advertised,[1] and its implications are far reaching.

What becomes clear is that God respects human freedom. He maintains a strict “non-interference” policy toward us. We are granted the God-given right to make our own decisions and choose our paths. This started with Eve and Adam and continues today. Yes, God maintains a noninterference policy toward human decision making. Blame for the horrors on this planet rests entirely on us.

From start to end, Jeremiah reinforces the terms of God’s covenant with the people of Israel. Leviticus 26 is the essential context for understanding the prophecies and events recorded there. It is well worth your time to read it. The people, through their centuries of rebellion, have reached the 5th, the severest stage of God’s corrective judgement. But the Lord still offers escape through repentance.

If I announce that a certain nation or kingdom is to be uprooted, torn down, and destroyed, but then that nation renounces its evil ways, I will not destroy it as I had planned. 18:7-8

Therefore, Jeremiah, go and warn all Judah and Jerusalem. Say to them, “This is what the LORD says: I am planning disaster for you instead of good. So turn from your evil ways, each of you, and do what is right.”  18:11.

This theme of non-interference underpins the whole message of Jeremiah and how the book interprets God’s actions throughout history. God’s offers of relief are woven throughout Jeremiah’s scroll (5:1, 7:3, 11:4, 17:24-25, 22:4-5, 26:13-15, 27:12-13, 38:17-18,20, 42:10). He is in no way belligerent or bullying. He is “slow to anger and abounding in lovingkindness.” The book of Jonah also highlights God as a responder to human choices.

Us followers of Jesus today must get this right. Its implications and applications are seismic for us personally, and for corporate gatherings of churches, missions, etc. It sharpens our understanding and approach to God. Shakes up our prayer life. Heightens our responsibility to know, understand, and assist those around us.


[1][1] Much preaching and writing today does not go deep enough into what this paper presents.

Reading the Bible with God at your side

This heading may seem strange, unusual, perhaps irreverent. Yet, reading the Bible while conscious of its Author’s physical presence will make a huge difference to your reading. He becomes the proverbial “elephant in the room.”[1] You can’t ignore Him. He doesn’t go away. You are obligated to relate everything you read to HIM.  You must respond.

An Example

Words that have become so familiar suddenly take on a new light. What is your response to Genesis 1:1 (when the Creator is there in the room with you)?

                “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.”

You might start with a simple “Thank you Lord, for creating this universe and giving me the opportunity to live in it.” 

But have you really recognized the “elephant in the room”? 

Isn’t the above response rather flippant and casual? 

Fall on the ground before Your/The Creator!  Be in awe! Stay on the ground for a few hours in the presence of such a One! Recognize this Living, Personal Being who created all things and is aware of little-ol’-you, and is there at your side!

This is a taste of what “Reading the Bible with God at your side” is about. The Bible is His book, His message, His truth, His word to you and everyone else on this planet.


[1] Large, out-of-place, unavoidable, can’t get out of your mind, makes one feel awkward, small, vulnerable,….